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written by | July 5, 2022

What Is Trial Balance and How does it Differ From Balance Sheet?

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Table of Content


For each organisation, a trial balance and a balance sheet are 2 major financial papers. But there are a lot of things that set these statements apart from one another. The process of creating a firm's balance sheet often begins with the preparation of a trial balance. Whereas a balance sheet highlights the entire obligations, property, and shareholder's equity in the firm, a trial balance highlights the ending balance of the several ledger accounts of the business.

Did you know?

Due to the fact that there are always equal sums on your debit and credit sides, your trial balance is called a 'trial balance.'

Difference Between Trial Balance and Balance Sheet

The balance sheet is typically made available to shareholders and other financial firms outside the organisation, but the trial balance is just a document that a company uses internally. The trial balance's main purpose is to determine whether the overall crediting and debits in the accounting records are in line. A trial balance might be created once each month or even once per quarter. Nevertheless, the balance form is documentation that the company creates each fiscal year. The below table provides a summary of the trial balance and balance sheet difference.

Alao Read: Costing: Definition, Objectives, and Advantages

Trial Balance

Balance Sheet

Contains each of the ledger accounts' closing balances.

Keeps track of the firm's profits, debts, and equities.

The company uses this to assess if the overall credits and debits of each ledger are in line.

The company uses this to assess if the property of the firm matches the debts plus equities. Additionally, it serves as evidence of the firm's financial transparency.

This is not an accounting statement.

This is an accounting statement.

The balances of debits and credits for each account are kept separately.

Assets, debts, and equities are separated for each account.

The company manages this internally.

It serves outside objectives.

The company documents the closing of each quarter, 1/2 year, and annual.

They document it at the conclusion of each fiscal year.

There is no requirement for the seal of an inspector.

It needs an inspector's confirmation.

They do not prepare the financial statements according to any specific rules.

In this, they organise content according to a specific format.

It doesn't appear in the financial statement.

It is a crucial component of the firm's final accounts.

What Is a Trial Balance?

The company maintains the end balance of each of the firm's ledger accounts in a trial balance. It is useful to verify if such credit and debit amounts are equal. In case the accounts don’t add up, it means that there may have been a documentation error, and they need to recheck the accounting records. The debits and credits have to be equal according to the rules of double-entry accounting. You should first comprehend the idea of debits and credits in order to fully comprehend the necessity of matching numbers in the trial balance.

Also Read: What is the Difference Between Single Entry and Double Entry Bookkeeping?

What Are Debits and Credits?

Debits and credits are the forms in which the company documents transactions after publication. Inside one ledger, they mention the transaction's total as a debit, whereas in another, they mention it as a credit. The guiding principle for documenting transactions is

  • Debit the accounts when the debts and income decline and the holdings and costs rise. 
  • Credit the accounts with rising debts and decreasing holdings and costs.

Therefore, when you sell the product and receive payment, you would record it as follows. A rise in income is seen in the vendor's cash. To document the transactions, the account balance of the business will be debited, and the trading account will be credited. The foundation of the dual entry bookkeeping system is a dual entry of receivable and payable.

Introduction of Trial Balance

Companies organises the ending balances of ledger accounts in the trial balance's credit and debit fields. The total of credits and debits for the specified timeframe must have to reflect accurately in case the company records each operation accurately. When there is a discrepancy, the company uses the suspense account to equalise the trial balance and alter the variation. Then they have to track the cause of the inaccuracy by reviewing the accounting records. After the cause is known, they correct the trial balance to achieve perfect equilibrium. Monthly or each quarter, a trial balance is kept so that they can identify any discrepancies in the accounting books and correct them as early as possible. It is a great internal control mechanism for ensuring that the company maintains all financial records accurately. This is the simplest way to find any incorrect or inappropriate entries in the accounting books.

Also Read: 3 Golden Rules of Accounting Explained with Best Examples

Benefits of Trial Balance

The following uses of the trial balance are beneficial:

  • Checking the numbers in the entry in the accounting books to make sure they add up
  • Additionally, you can use it to find publishing errors.
  • Matching existing information with previous data and vice versa. 
  • A trial balance, for instance, they create for a specific time frame and then compare it with the same time frame the year prior.
  • It is beneficial to create budgeting as well as other financial projections for the given time frame.
  • Checking for mistakes and then following the audit trail is a crucial first stage in the auditing procedure.
  • To prepare the other yearly annual documents and declarations, the trial balance is the first-ever stage.
  • The presence of a fair trial balance indicates that there is no false information in the accounting books. It provides a convenient overview of any of the firm's accounting books that superiors may utilise for conferences and decision-making.

Drawbacks of Trial Balance

The following things a trial balance could not do:

  • You cannot determine the case if the clerk misses any entry
  • One cannot detect if they enter the improper sum in both a debit and a credit.
  • duplicate postings
  • If they enter the correct amount in the incorrect account,

What Is the Balance Sheet?

2 columns on a balance sheet are assets and debts. It provides a precise image of a firm's entire financial situation and state of health. Let's use a hypothetical transaction to demonstrate how it'd appear here on the balance sheet. They add funds to the cash book if a business borrows ₹10,000 in cash from a lender. As a result, the money items on the assets section of the balance sheet will increase by ₹10,000. Additionally, it would increase the deficit line on the liabilities field by ₹10,000. It is a straightforward explanation of how they create a balance sheet. You must comprehend what assets and debts are to comprehend a balance sheet completely. 

Also Read: Meaning of Accountancy and How it Differs From Accounting

Drawbacks of Balance Sheet

A balance sheet has the following disadvantages:

  • The cost of the asset which you purchase is shown on the balance sheet. On the balance sheet, a property that a corporation creates internally is not listed. This may be the outcome of an in-house study or the creation of a webpage or web portal.
  • Even when they estimate depreciation, the assessment of internal capital like equipment doesn't always correspond to the asset's true worth following excessive wear.
  • It solely represents the firm's financial situation as of the close of each year. The balance sheet will always look fine if the business pays off all of its liabilities by the deadline, and one might assume that the business was in a solid economic position that year.

Conclusion:

The trial balance and the balance sheet vary markedly from one another. However, the balance sheet and trial balance always relate to each other. As a result, even when the company generates the trial balance only for administrative use and to check that the trades are accurately entered, they cannot document the balance sheet correctly without one. If you comprehend debit, crediting, log, and ledger, comprehending the trial balance and balance sheet will be a lot simpler. It all comes down to knowing the basics and using them when you require them. 

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FAQs

Q: One difference between trial balance and balance sheet?

Ans:

A balance sheet describes the entire debts, assets, and investor's equity in the business, whereas a trial balance highlights the ending balance of the several ledger accounts of the corporation.

Q: Why does the company refer to the balance sheet as a second trial balance?

Ans:

Companies sometimes refer balance sheet as the second trial balance because it is created using the ledger accounting's final values at the close of each year. The resources part and the closing of debts are the 2 aspects of a balance sheet. Accounts with negative balances display on the asset field, while those with positive balances display on the debts side. The two sides must match.

Q: What is trial Balance?

Ans:

A company balances the business book accounts with the aid of a trial balance, which is mainly an accountancy report. One field inside a trial balance document contains credit values, and another contains debit sums. It is important that you must understand that the two columns must always be the same.

Q: What is a balance sheet?

Ans:

A balance sheet is simply a financial report that lists the debts, assets, and stock that investors have ownership interests in for a given period. The balance sheet serves as the foundation for calculating the return rates and assessing the cash position.

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The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.
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Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.