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written by | August 1, 2022

Operating Cycle - Learn How to Calculate the Operating Cycle

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A smart technique to assess a company's financial health is to follow an operational cycle over time. Additionally, the company can use it to assess how effectively and efficiently processes are carried out. Even though a firm's operating cycle depends on the market, understanding it is helpful when comparing it to other businesses in a similar sector. Furthermore, an operating cycle also helps in attracting more investors to your company.

Did you know? Accounting cycles ensure that all the money entering and leaving a business is accounted for. That's why balancing is so important.

What Is an Operating Cycle?

Let us first define operating cycle. The time taken by a business to purchase items, market them, and receive payment for the sales is called an operating cycle. It is, in other terms, the time it takes for a business to convert its stocks into money. A business determines how long an operating cycle should be. Knowledge of a firm's operating cycle could assist in establishing its financial condition by providing a sense of whether or not it will be capable of paying off any creditors. For instance, a company will get payments at a consistent pace if its operational cycle is shorter. The quicker a business makes money, the more capable it will be of paying off any obligations due or growing as necessary.

An operational cycle has the following flow:

  • Getting the raw materials
  • Making products
  • Owning completed products
  • Having outstanding debt due to a sale
  • Getting money (Company receiving cash from the firm)

It's crucial to distinguish between an operating cycle and a cash cycle. A cash cycle shows the businesses how they may control their working capital. In contrast, an operating cycle assesses the effectiveness of the operations, yet they are both beneficial and offer essential knowledge.

Also Read: What Are Expenses in Accounting?

Formula

The following is the operating cycle formula:

Inventory Period + Accounts Receivable Time = An Operating Cycle, where:

  • The duration that inventory remains in the warehouse before being sold is known as the inventory period.
  • The time taken to receive money from the stock sales is known as the accounts receivable time.

Why Is an Operating Cycle Important? 

An operating cycle is crucial since it can show a firm's owners how fast they can sell the stock. It establishes the effectiveness of the organisation. A shorter operating cycle, for instance, indicates that the business was capable of turning around rather rapidly. It might also imply that the credit policy is tougher and the payment schedule is shorter. A shorter operating cycle is better since it indicates that the business has sufficient cash on hand to fund operations, recoup expenditures, and fulfil other commitments. 

A longer operational cycle, on the other hand, indicates that the business needs more money to keep running. There are many factors that influence the company's operational cycle, and vice versa is true in terms of how a company can use an operating cycle to assess a firm's financial health. A business founder's ability to make choices that will improve the firm depends on how well they comprehend the firm's operating cycle. The operating cycle in financial management is, therefore, very important.

Also Read:  What Is an Accounting Information System? Explained

How to Determine an Operating Cycle? 

Company owners must compute their operating cycle in addition to assessing operational productivity. To perform this computation, adhere to the following steps:

  •  Determine the Inventory Period

When figuring out their operating cycle, business people must first determine their inventory period. A firm's inventory holding period is the amount of time it keeps its stock before selling it. Here’s the formula a company uses to determine its inventory time frame:

Inventory period equals 365 divided by inventory turnover. Inventory turnover demonstrates the number of times a company has sold or replaced inventory in a given time frame.  

Divide the price of products sold by the average inventory ratio to find a firm's turnover ratio. Inventory turnover refers to the number of times a business’ inventory has been sold. The average inventory is the mean of the sum of beginning and closing inventories of a business. While the prices of products sold may be seen in the company's income, you can also see them on the business's balance sheet.

  •  Determine the Company’s Accounts Receivable

Company owners must also know their accounts receivable to calculate their operating cycle. The sum of money a consumer owes a business is its accounts receivable. One method for calculating accounts receivable is given below:

Receivables turnover/365 equals the accounts receivable duration.

One must divide crediting purchases by the median accounts receivable to find a firm's receivables turnover.

  •  Calculate the Operating Cycle

You can determine the operational cycle using the formula below:

The operational cycle is equal to the sum of the inventory and receivables periods.

Another way to use this formula is:

Operational cycle: (365/(price of items sold/average stock)) + (365/(crediting sales/average accounts receivable))

The final figure represents the total number of business days.

Also Read:  The Complete Guide to Cost and Management Accounting

Tips for Shortening a Company’s Operating Cycle

When seeking to reduce a firm's operating cycle, keep the following suggestions in mind:

Establish a Stronger Credit Policy  

Users are more likely to make payments for their purchases on time for businesses with stricter credit policies.

Shorten the Length of the Payment Plans

As a firm's operating cycle shortens,  the faster it is capable of gathering accounts receivable.

Sell a Firm's Products Faster 

A firm must keep the shortest possible operating cycle.

Examples of Operating Cycles

It's crucial to take into account different conditions in order to comprehend operational cycles. Following are a few instances of operating cycles:

Example1 

Let's imagine Amy is a retailer of apparel. Once she starts paying for the supplies to produce the various clothes, her firm's operational cycle will start. In this scenario, the operational cycle will not be complete till they make all pieces of clothing, sell them, and receive complete payment from the client.

Example2

Let's imagine that Robert is a pastry shop owner who is attempting to gauge how efficiently things are going in his business. He will have to determine the operational cycle of his business to accomplish this. This indicates that the cycle would begin as soon as he starts paying for the items, supplies, and components necessary to manufacture different cakes and delicacies. The operational cycle of his pastry shop will not be complete unless all of his baked items have been purchased by consumers and he receives the complete payment.

Also Read:  Know the Basics of Managerial Accounting

Net Operating Cycle vs Operating Cycle

The net operating cycle and the operational cycle are the terms that usually confuse us. The net operating cycle is the money conversion cycle or cash cycle that shows how long it takes a business to earn money from the sales of stock. 

Operating Cycle: The period of time between the moment a customer purchases an item and a company receives money from its sales.

Net operating cycle: The interval between purchasing inventory and receiving money from sales of those goods is known as the NOC.

In particular, the net operating cycle formula is as follows:

Inventory Period + Accounts Receivable Period - Accounts Payable Period = the Net Operating Cycle

They subtract accounts payable time by the net operating cycle, which causes a variance between the two calculations. The company is able to accomplish it since the net operating cycle only cares about the period from when an inventory is purchased to when they receive money from the sales of stock.

Conclusion:

Utilising the effectiveness of your accounting cycle process to its full potential, you can realise higher profits for your company. This implies that investment in improvement in operational procedure can lower costs, quicken processes, and enhance quality, all of which can ultimately result in higher profits. The price of things like inventories, non-selling expenditures (i.e., basic administration), payroll waste, etc., can reduce, thanks to organisational effectiveness. This indicates that more cash is available for maximising investors’ value or corporate reinvestment. Businesses benefit from successful operational processes by increasing their working capital, which favours other areas of their operations.

Follow Khatabook for the latest updates, news blogs, and articles related to micro, small and medium businesses (MSMEs), business tips, income tax, GST, salary, and accounting.

FAQs

Q: What advantages can effective operational procedures offer?

Ans:

Businesses benefit from successful operational processes by increasing their cash flow, which has a favourable impact on other areas of their operations. Business owners may benefit from cutting expenses while accelerating production and enhancing quality. Increasing a company's efficiency frequently leads to higher profitability.

Q: What are a few instances of companies with long or short operational cycles?

Ans:

Vendors and other companies that sell goods with limited shelf lifetimes (such as food, garments, and devices) perform on shorter cycles, whereas companies that provide services that use staff or machinery for long periods incur greater operating prices and have longer operating cycles.

Q: How does an Operating Cycle relate to the financial stability of a company?

Ans:

The longer it takes to obtain funds, the lesser the cash would be, the longer the operational cycle. A shorter operating cycle is preferred by businesses. A company may experience cash flow issues if its operating cycle is too long.

Q: What does an operating cycle mean?

Ans:

The days needed for a business to receive inventory, sell the inventory, and collect money from the sale of the inventory is referred to as an operating cycle (OC).

Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.
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Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.