written by | June 6, 2022

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Table of content


Table of content

What are the Types of Business Entities?

India is identified among the world's fastest-growing economies, with its financial industry playing a critical role. India is going through a major economic transition, and it is encouraging FDI by opening up its enormous and diverse market. As a result of these considerations, many companies are aiming to expand by establishing a presence in India.

One of the first things you should do when beginning a business is to determine the form of your organisation — in other words, select a business entity kind.

Your Company will suffer severe legal and financial implications as a result of this decision. The business entity you choose determines the amount of taxation you must spend and the ease with which you can receive a small business loan or raise capital from investors. Furthermore, the form of your business entity has an impact on your exposure to risk if you are prosecuted.

Continue reading to discover more about starting a business in India and the different types of business entities available.

Did you know?

The business Entity's goal is straightforward. The distinction and preservation of personal and professional assets are ensured by establishing them as a business entity.

Also Read: Importance of the Registrar of Companies India for Setting Up a New Business

Kabbage Business Checking

Kabbage Checking is a free online business checking account that has no minimum initial payment and has zero balance. It stands out among other corporate checking accounts since it pays a higher Annual Percentage Yield on holdings up to ₹7600,000. The account has a reasonable interest rate, low fees, and an easy registration process, making it an appealing option for small-business owners who want to handle their accounts online.

Furthermore, you can operate your account via the same dashboard as Kabbage's other programs, including Kabbage Insights, Payment, and Funding, making it an excellent choice for business owners who foresee future financing or financial needs.

Reserves help you organise your money so that you can save for concrete objectives or classifications. Account-holders can now acquire up to 5 Reserves. Funds in Reserves should be transferred to your bank account before they may be utilised.

Sole Proprietorship

A sole proprietorship is a business entity in which one individual supervises the entire operation. All revenues and losses in the firm are solely distributed to the individual. The owner's obligation is limitless. A sole proprietorship company is appropriate where the playing field is small, localised, and clients value personalised service. This type of business is effective when the amount of money required is low since sole proprietorship does not have a legal existence; minor legal requirements exist.

Advantages of a Sole Proprietorship

  • Making quick judgments - A solo entrepreneur is fully responsible for all business decisions. Because there is no need to contact several stakeholders for every minor issue, the firm can make decisions quickly.
  • Single decision-maker - A sole owner can retain all business-related data themselves as the single decision-maker for the business. They are not required by law to make sole proprietorship reports public.
  • Profit-sharing - A sole proprietor owns all of the earnings generated by his or her business. They are not compelled to distribute gains to others.
  • Fulfilment - Because alone owner is responsible for both the risks and the rewards of their firm, even little success can provide a higher sense of pride & fulfilment than other types of businesses.

Disadvantages of a Sole Proprietorship

  • Lack of Resources - Raising significant funds in a sole proprietorship is more complicated than in a partnership or corporation. This type of business relies heavily on the owner's savings and borrowings. A lack of sufficient funds might be a barrier to the Company's growth.
  • Dependence on the owner - The owner and their firms are the same in a sole proprietorship. While this offers various advantages, this type of business's success depends on the owner's health.
  • Unlimited Liability - If the proprietor's personal property is used to cover business debts, their private possessions are likewise at risk. As a result, sole traders take a little risk to secure the business's sustainability.

General Partnership 

A general partnership (GP) is a contract between two or more people to form and administer a company together. It is among the most prevalent legal forms of business formation. In a general partnership, all partners are liable for the company and have unlimited liability for its obligations.

A partner is a shareholder or partner in a general partner who is personally liable for the business's debts. The firm is actively managed and controlled by a general partner.

Each member in a general partnership can sign contracts or business arrangements that bind the other partners. While this is advantageous, it also implies that you should have complete faith in the individual or persons with whom you begin your business. While it may be enjoyable to set up a business with a relative or friend, they may not be the best business partners. Your partner's behaviour or blunders can have financial and legal consequences for you.

Usually, general partnerships adopt a founders' contract or partnership contract to avoid and settle problems. The contract spells forth the company's governance model as well as each founder's rights and obligations. In most cases, the contract also covers voting rights and revenue distribution.

Advantages of a General Partnership

  • Simple to Form: A general partnership is as simple to establish as a single proprietorship. The foundation of a partnership business requires only a few procedures and documentation, such as a comprehensive partnership agreement that explains the obligations of each member of the business.
  • Business Entity by Default: There is no need to write a comprehensive legal business agreement before starting operations if each participant in a general partnership relies on the parameters for their firm among themselves.
  • Diversity: As in a general partnership, individuals from many origins and ethnicities come together to pool their funds in order to create a general partnership, which can result in successful profitability.
  • Distribution of Equal Rights: When a general partnership company is formed, all of the members have full equality in governing the company's operations. This offers huge partnerships a cause to write a contract that spells out every member's role and obligations inside the organisation.

Disadvantages of a General Partnership

  • Personal Liability Risks: Because a general partnership does not function as a separate organisation, it lacks the financial protection of personal assets that a corporation or other types of business formations provide.
  • Dissolution is simple: The company and relationship can easily be dissolved if one of the partners decides to quit for whatever reason or if one of the partners dies. In the event of the loss of even one partner, the business must cease operations.
  • Difficulty in Obtaining Funding: Each member in a general partnership has personal income tax duties as well as common financial liabilities, which they can't control directly, and, therefore, detest being a part of such a corporate structure.
  • No Interest Transfer: A partner cannot trade or unload their interest with their own company unless it is specifically stated in the general partnership contract. Some states use the majority voting procedure because there are no strict requirements for a shift of interest.

Limited Partnership

A partnership is a corporation held by two or more individuals who each provide anything of value to the table, such as capital, land, expertise, or labour. Members share in the firm's profits and losses. All of this stands true in a limited partnership. However, there are two sorts of members in a limited partnership: general or limited partners.

The general partners are involved in the daily operations of the company. Each general partner is personally liable for the partnership's debts, responsibilities, and actions. This means that anyone can prosecute one or all general partners if they have a legitimate claim against the partnership. If the partnership's corporate assets are insufficient, they can even demand the general partners' personal possessions.

Advantages of a Limited Partnership

  • Tax advantages: Earnings & expenses in a limited partnership go through the firm to the partners, who are all charged on their individual income tax returns, just like in a general partnership.
  • Limitations on Liability: The obligation of a limited partner for the firm's debt is restricted to the extent of land or assets supplied by the individual partners.
  • General partners seize command: General partners handle day-to-day operations and duties, and most business decisions are made without consulting the limited partners.
  • No concerns with a turnover: Despite terminating the limited partnership, partners might be changed or dismissed.
  • Paperwork is reduced: Unlike founding a corporation, forming a partnership firm, needs less paperwork. However, it's critical to draught and submits a partnership contract in the region where the firm operates.

Disadvantages of a Limited Partnership

  • General partners' threats: General partners are liable for all debts and liabilities of the company. All debts and obligations are the concern of the general partners if the company enters bankruptcy.
  • Compliance problems: A general partnership is less paper-intensive than a company. You should, nevertheless, hold yearly meetings and write a formal partnership agreement since you have shareholders.

Also Read: How to start a Security Company for Security Solutions

C- Corporation

The most popular type of corporation is the C-corporation, which is effectively the default option. The IRS Code subchapter for which it is named. A company income tax is paid initially by the company with an income tax return as mandated by the IRS with a C-corp status. Any income gains must after that be taxed as individual income on an interpersonal basis by shareholders.

C-corporations have few limitations about who can own stocks, allowing for membership by both domestic and international enterprises and organisations. The overall number of outstanding shares is also unrestricted. To maintain company protections, C-corps, like all organisations, must adhere to operational standards known as "corporate formalities."

S- Corporation

An S-corp, like a C-corp, is made up of stockholders, administrators, and executives who adhere to business regulations in order to appreciate the same personal liability safeguards. An S-corp differs from a C-corp because it escapes a double taxation problem. S-corporations are "pass-through tax corporations," which means that profits can be distributed to stockholders without first being subjected to corporate taxes.

An S-corp essentially combines the tax benefits of a partnership with the corporate safeguards of a C-corp. S-corps are susceptible to a set of laws in return for these privileges, including a total shareholder restriction of 100 and tight limits about which types of businesses can become stockholders.

Limited Liability Company

A limited liability company (LLC) is a type of private firm that combines elements of corporations and partnerships. While keeping the limited liability position of businesses, limited liability firms benefit from the freedom and stream taxes of limited proprietorships. As a large corporate form, its purpose was to share profits with the partners while simultaneously protecting individuals from individual culpability for the organisation's debts. Except if the company owner forms a separate organisation, the proprietor and any associates accept full responsibility for the company's debts.

However, under LLC laws, a member is not liable for the firm's debts if they did not personally guarantee them, such as with a new loan, personal line of credit, or placing a financial property on the line.

How to select the Best Business Entity?

When deciding on a company entity, think about: 

  1. How much your personal wealth is at stake from the business's debts.
  2. How to maximise tax benefits while avoiding several layers of taxes
  3. The skill to acquire new investors.
  4. The Skill to provide essential personnel with equity stakes.
  5. The expenditures of running and maintaining the company.

We must look into the following factors before selecting a business entity:

  • Flexibility: Where do you see your company going, and what kind of legal structure will allow it to expand the way you want it to? Examine your goals in your business strategy to determine which structure is most suited to achieving them. Your organisation should foster the prospect of development and change rather than stifle it.
  • Complexity: There is nothing more simple than a sole proprietorship in terms of setup and operational complexity. Open a company under your name, record your profits, and pay the taxes on it as individual income. Outside funding, on the other hand, can be hard to come by. Partnerships necessitate a formal agreement that spells out the duties and profit splits. The state govt and the federal govt have different reporting obligations for corporations and limited liability companies.
  • Liability: Because it is its own legal body, a company bears the smallest level of personal guilt. This means that creditors and consumers can sue the company, but they won't be able to seize the officials' or stockholders' individual assets. An LLC provides the same level of security as a sole proprietorship while also providing tax advantages. Partnerships divide liabilities among the partners according to the terms of their memorandum of understanding.
  • Taxes: A limited liability company founder pays the taxes in the same way that a sole proprietor pays: all profits are treated as personal income and taxed as such at the end of each year. People who are involved in a partnership can take their portion of the wealth as individual income as well. To minimise the impact on return, your accountant may recommend monthly or yearly prepayments.

Conclusion

At its most basic level, a business entity is an organisation that has been founded to conduct business. However, the sort of business entity you choose affects how your firm is formed and taxed. The entity you choose for your business is crucial. The entity you choose has a significant influence on how individuals perceive your company and, more crucially, your legal liability and revenue. Ultimately, while there isn't one optimal business entity for all small enterprises, you can determine which one is perfect for you by studying this book and reviewing financial and legal professionals. 

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FAQs

Q: What are the Tax Advantages of a Limited Partnership Business Entity launched?

Ans:

Earnings & expenses in a limited partnership go through the firm to the partners, who are all charged on their individual income tax returns, just like in a general partnership.

Q: What is LLC Business Entity?

Ans:

Limited liability company (LLC) is a type of private firm that combines elements of corporations and partnerships.

Q: How are rights divided in a general partnership business entity?

Ans:

When a general partnership company is formed, all of the members have full equality in governing the company's operations.

Q: Why is acquiring funding in a general partnership business entity difficult?

Ans:

 Each member in a general partnership has personal income tax duties as well as common financial liabilities, which they can't control directly, and, therefore, detest being a part of such a corporate structure.

Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.

Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.