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written by | August 18, 2022

Accounts Payable Journal Entries; Examples & Types

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A company uses a record-keeping system to track all its financial transactions. This system, known as the general ledger accounting, stores information on revenue, expenses, liabilities, and assets. It is used in generating financial reports. Any account displaying money in the general ledger that the organisation owes to its creditors is considered Accounts Payable. This may be on any account. The Accounts Payable represent the short-term debt that has been accumulated for services and items credited before receiving payment from the supplier. This Accounts Payable journal entry will manage and preserve the company's finances by offering the assurance that only the valid invoices are paid. When you hear the phrase "Accounts Receivable," remember that it is the exact opposite of the idea of "Accounts Payable." In this context, "Accounts Receivable" refers to the amount of money due for payment to the firm from its customers or clients.

Did you know? The journal entry is essential because it demonstrates the organisation's current level of responsibility in the market.

What Is a Journal Entry for Accounts Payable?

An Account Payable entry must be created for every transaction, even if the sums involved are the same for both credit and debit. So what is the Accounts Payable journal entry? A journal entry for Accounts Payable marks the trade of the Accounts Payable by listing all expenditures deducted from the total amount that must be paid.

Also Read: What is Accounting Cycle: Definition and Steps in the Accounting Cycle Process.

Each credit journal entry should also have a debit entry setting. The accountants will make the journal entries for the Accounts Payable by categorising the expenses under separate accounts and then debiting those assets. The agreements between the corporation and its suppliers are often in existence, and they will stimulate both the duration and the credit conditions. For example, one of the vendors may only provide credit for a month, while another vendor, one with whom the vendor has already established a working relationship, may offer a 12-month grace period before payment is due.

Let's better understand the Accounts Payable process journal entries by looking at the following example.

In a neighbourhood, Super Electronics offers televisions with larger screens. Accounts Payable manager John has shown interest in presenting an overview of the department's day-to-day activities. Bill payment and bookkeeping are only part of the job. The focus is on the accounts themselves. John and his four assistants will manage the Accounts Payable. As a result of this process, only valid invoices for the correct amounts will be paid. In the future, Accounts Payable will be responsible for paying all valid invoices.

An incorrectly recorded purchase transaction might hurt the financial status of the business. Documents must be kept meticulously. Thus, Accounts Payable accounting entries ensure that financial statements are accurate. At this electronics facility, there is a certified public accountant who works on staff, as well as other administrative assistants who assist in monitoring.

Also Read: What are Accounting Principles and Accounting Concepts - Here's a Detailed Overview

How Should Accounts Payable Be Recorded?

Accounts Payable journal entries are recorded in accounting books according to a procedure. When an organisation or a company purchases products or services from a vendor, they must create Accounts Payable and receivable journal entries in the appropriate section of the accounting software to maintain accurate financial records.

A journal has two distinct categories of entries. The journal contains both simple and complex entries.

The following should be considered while searching for journal entries related to accounts payable.

1. Account for the acquisition of items and inventories.

2. Inventories that have been damaged or are not wanted are sent back to the supplier.

3. An entry is made on the account whenever there is an acquisition of an asset that is not an inventory item.

4. An entry is produced in the journal whenever a charge is made to the account for services bought.

5. Make an entry when a payment has been made to the Accounts Payable or the creditor.

Here are examples of Accounts Payable journal entries that will help us grasp the idea. 

The XYZ company acquired the automobile on credit from ABC firm on January 1, 2021. The purchase price was ₹40,000. Every business is required to retain its unique account charts for its bookkeeping, and XYZ company is one of those companies. The XYZ company is responsible for the maintenance and accounting of the assets called vehicles for the purchased recording of the vehicle assets.

Therefore, the asset account will have ₹40,000 subtracted from it, and the Accounts Payable charge will have ₹40,000 added to it as a credit.

Therefore, the entry in the diary may be worded like this:

Ac. Name

Debit

Credit

Vehicles for transportation

₹40,000

 

Accounts payable

 

₹40,000

Making a notation in the diary on the purchase of stock using credit:

A/C Name

Debit 

Credit

Purchases

XXXX

 
   

XXXX

Recording a Credit Purchase in a Journal Entry

A/C Name

Debit 

Credit

Account of expenses

XXXX

 

Accounts payable

 

XXXX

The Journal Entry for Paying a Vendor in Cash

A/C Name

Debit 

Credit

Accounts payable

XXXX

 

Cash

 

XXXX

Where can one look up the Accounts Payables for a company?

The Accounts Payable entry in the tally may be seen by following the steps below:

  • One may enter the Tally Gateway and then display additional reports.
  • The account statement may then be examined.
  • To find an account's payables in Tally, enter Outstandings and Payables.

Also Read: 3 Golden Rules of Accounting - Golden Rules of Accounts Explained with Examples

Accounts Payable Process: 5 Stages

The method for Accounts Payable in every organisation differs according to the size and organisational structure of the business. In smaller firms, the Manager of Accounts Payable is the one who is responsible for the whole process. Still, in larger organisations, several executives will individually be in charge of each phase.

Stage 1: Either Get the Purchase Invoice or the Bill

Once the Purchase Order (PO) is acknowledged and approved by the vendor, they will ship the products to your warehouse or shop, along with the invoice.

The purchase invoice may be sent to the customer by the vendors in a paper, fax, or email. After considering applicable discounts, the bought services, products, and inventory will be itemised on the invoices, with the applicable taxes and total amount due. The receipt for the purchase, or the bill, will be placed into the accounting system.

Stage 2: Assigning the Bill to Be Processed Internally

The internal assignment of the purchase invoice will take place as soon as it has been received for processing. It is the responsibility of the Accounts Payable Managers to compare and verify it with the PO that was submitted to the vendor.

Stage 3: Bill Details Review

At this essential stage, the Accounts Payable Manager ensures that the purchase invoice bill has all the necessary information. This includes, but is not limited to, the specifics about the vendor name, payment details, etc.

Stage 4: Update the Financial Records

As soon as the bill has been verified and received, the ledger accounts need to be updated, and an entry has to be made in the books referred to as the financial books about the bill.

Stage 5: The Bill Payment

Making the payment on the invoice for the purchase is the next critical step after recording the expenses incurred. They need to keep a close eye on all the bills to ensure they are paid on time to avoid the fees assessed for payments received beyond the due date. The seller's account information should be included in the payment voucher that has to be filled out. Before the payment issue voucher can be sent to the vendor, there is sometimes a need for approval in certain businesses.

Also Read: Difference Between Cost Accounting and Financial Accounting

Conclusion:

Every company transaction will need a corresponding journal entry, and the Accountant must make the transactions themselves to translate them into information to prepare financial reports. The Accounts Payable journal entry is responsible for recording financial transactions, and for creating a journal entry, you need first to record the transaction's specifics in the company's books. 

The amount that must be paid to the organisation's creditors for purchased products and services is recorded in the Accounts Payable journal entries. This account is debited anytime a payment is made and displayed on the income statement under the current head liabilities section. 

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FAQs

Q: Is it conceivable that the amount of the account due might be included as an expense?

Ans:

If a business owes money to any of its creditors, it is said to have Accounts Payable obligation, which is more often abbreviated as AP.

Q: Explain the phrase "accounts payable double entry".

Ans:

In double-entry accounting, a credit is always entered as part of the transaction if there is an increase in Accounts Payable. On the other hand, a growth in Accounts Receivable is never recorded as a credit in the accounting books.

Q: Which Accounts Payable column does one's payment go into, the credit column or the debit column?

Ans:

Accounts payable may function either as a credit or a debit in the realm of finance and accounting.

Q: What information is kept in the area that deals with the Accounts Payable?

Ans:

Accounts Payable include any debts and obligations the firm owes to third parties on a more immediate timescale.

Q: What does it the term Accounts Payable journal entry mean?

Ans:

Receivables from accounts journal entries are a type of accounting entry that records the amount of money owed to creditors for purchasing goods or services. 

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The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.
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Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.