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written by | April 14, 2022

What is a Cash Flow Statement?

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A cash flow statement is a financial statement that summarises all of a business's cash inflows, including those from ongoing operations and outside investments. The cash flow statement includes expenditures on corporate activity and investments. As an investor or analyst, it is critical to understand how each transaction contributes to a company's long-term financial performance as measured by its financial statements. Because it records the cash flow of the business in three distinct categories—operations, investment, and financing—the cash flow statement is usually regarded as the clearest of all financial statements. The sum of these three components is called net cash flow.

Did you know?

If a company says it is offering ₹100 crores in equity, this could be spread over several years or involve major fees and expenses. Hence, the cash flow statement is the only primary financial statement that can show the exact amount of money that was deposited into the company's bank account - and when.

Understanding the Cash Flow Statement

A company's inflows and outflows of CCE (cash and cash equivalents) are summarised in the cash flow statement (CFS). A company's ability to generate enough cash to pay its debt commitments and operating expenses is determined by the CFS. The CFS is one of the three primary financial statements, alongside the balance sheet and income statement, and serves as a useful supplement to both. 

Here, we'll go through the CFS's structure and how to use it in a firm analysis.

  • When a company reports its cash flow, it shows how much money it has and how much money it has spent.
  •  When it comes to financial management, the CFS shows how well a company is able to create cash.
  • It is meant to be used in conjunction with the income statement and the balance sheet to provide a comprehensive picture.
  • Operating, investing, and financing activities all generate cash for the CFS.
  • Calculating cash flow can be done directly or indirectly.

How the Cash Flow Statement Is Used

Essentially, a cash flow statement summarises how well a company's operations are operating, where its money is coming from, and how the company is spending it. For creditors, the cash flow statement, often known as a statement of cash flows, is a critical instrument in estimating how much cash a business has available to fulfil operational expenses and repay debt. As a result, consumers can utilise the statement to help them make better informed financial decisions in the future.

Structure of the Cash Flow Statement

The cash flow statement includes the following:

1.    Amount of money available for operating expenses.

2.    Money that's coming in from investments.

3.    Financing operations generate cash flow.

4.    Non-cash activities must be disclosed.

Cash From Operating Activities

On the CFS, operating activities encompass all sources and uses of business capital. The net profit of a business is a metric that indicates how much money it earns from the sale of its products and/or services.

The following are some examples of operational duties that could be performed:

  • Receipts for goods and services sold.
  • Loan interest.
  • Income tax payments.
  •  To suppliers of materials and services necessary for manufacturing goods and services.
  • Compensation for employees, including wages and salaries.
  • Rental fee per month.
  • Any other expenses incurred in the course of conducting business.

Because it is a business activity, receipts from the sale of loans, debt, or equity instruments are also included in a trading portfolio or investment firm.

Also Read: Fund Flow Statement - Meaning, Format And Examples

Cash from Investing Activities

The word "investment activities" refers to all of the ways in which a company's investments produce and spend money. This category includes transactions involving the acquisition, selling, or financing of assets, as well as mergers and acquisitions (M&A). Changes in assets, investments, and equipment generate cash from investments.

Due to the fact that cash is often used to acquire new equipment, buildings, or short-term assets such as marketable securities, cash flow statements from the investment are typically considered cash-out items. To determine the amount of money a firm has earned through an investment, the sale of an asset is considered a cash-in.

Cash from Financing Activities

Various parties, including investors, banks, and shareholders, make monetary contributions to the company, which are reflected in the amount of cash on hand. Payments for stock purchases as well as the repayment of debt principal fall within this classification (loans).

Raising capital and distributing dividends are examples of cash flow statements and cash-out transactions that a firm can engage in. To put it another way, when a company issues public bonds, it receives a certain amount of money. The company's cash reserves, on the other hand, are being depleted as a result of interest payments to bondholders. In spite of the fact that interest is a cash-out cost, it is listed as an operating expense rather than a finance expense on the company's balance sheet.

How Cash Flow Is Calculated

The direct method and the indirect technique are the two approaches used to calculate cash flow statements in a business.

Direct Cash Flow Method

The direct method includes all cash payments and receipts, including payments to suppliers, cash flow statement revenues from consumers, and salary payments. It is the most common way of accounting. Small businesses that operate on a cash basis will benefit from this type of CFS because it is more convenient for them.

These statistics can also be produced using a variety of asset and liability accounts, and the net loss or increase in the accounts can be studied using these accounts. It's laid out in a straightforward and concise manner, which is appreciated.

Also Read: What are Consolidated Financial Statements?

Indirect Cash Flow Method

By employing the indirect method to calculate the cash flow statement, you can alter net income by adding or subtracting non-cash transaction differences. Non-cash items are recorded on the balance sheet as changes in the assets and liabilities of a business over time. As a result, the accountant will identify any asset and liability account increases or decreases that should be added to or subtracted from the net income figure in order to arrive at an appropriate cash flow or outflow.

  • The cash flow statement must reflect changes in accounts receivable (AR) on the balance sheet from one accounting period to the next.
  • Customers may have paid off their credit cards, resulting in a gain in cash flow, contributing to net earnings if AR decreases. 
  • AR must be deducted from net earnings since, while it is a source of revenue, it is not a source of cash.

Increases in inventory suggest that a business spends more money on raw materials. When a business utilises a cash flow statement, the increase in the value of its inventory is deducted from the company's net income.

Taxes owed, wages paid, and premiums for insurance paid in advance all follow the same logic. If anything has been paid off, and year-over-year change in the amount outstanding must be subtracted from net income. Regardless of the amount owed, any discrepancies must be added to the business's net earnings.

Limitations of the Cash Flow Statement

Without doing a comprehensive analysis, cash flow concerns should not be construed as a warning indication. Due to the decision to develop the business, several businesses have experienced a prolonged period of negative cash flow, which is a healthy sign for the future.

By examining the differences in cash flow statements from one quarter to the next, it is possible to assess whether a business is headed for bankruptcy or success. Furthermore, CFS should be examined in conjunction with the other two financial statements.

Conclusion

A cash flow statement is a financial statement that shows how much money a company has coming in and going out. It is meant to be used in conjunction with the income statement and balance sheet to provide a comprehensive picture of a firm's long-term financial performance. For creditors, the cash flow statement (CFS) is a critical instrument in estimating how much cash a business has available to fulfil operational expenses and repay debt. Financial stability is important to investors since it reveals if a company is financially sound. Consumers can utilise the CFS to help make better informed financial decisions. Without doing a comprehensive analysis, cash flow concerns should not be construed as a warning indication. A cash flow statement is a financial statement that summarises all of a business's cash inflows, including those from ongoing operations. The cash flow statement includes expenditures on corporate activity and investments. Non-cash accounts, such as depreciation and amortisation, are excluded from this calculation.

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FAQs

Q: Are you familiar with how to create a cash flow statement?

Ans:

You may estimate the cash flow generated by investing by adding up all of the cash inflows from asset sales and all of the cash outflows from payments for new fixed assets or investments.

Q: Which three items are the most critical to examine when analysing a cash flow statement?

Ans:

When classifying transactions, the three categories of cash flow activities — operating, investing, and financing — must be identified.

Q: What is a cash flow statement?

Ans:

A cash flow statement is a financial statement that summarises all of a business's cash inflows, including those from ongoing operations and outside investments.

Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.
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Disclaimer :
The information, product and services provided on this website are provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis without any warranty or representation, express or implied. Khatabook Blogs are meant purely for educational discussion of financial products and services. Khatabook does not make a guarantee that the service will meet your requirements, or that it will be uninterrupted, timely and secure, and that errors, if any, will be corrected. The material and information contained herein is for general information purposes only. Consult a professional before relying on the information to make any legal, financial or business decisions. Use this information strictly at your own risk. Khatabook will not be liable for any false, inaccurate or incomplete information present on the website. Although every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this website is updated, relevant and accurate, Khatabook makes no guarantees about the completeness, reliability, accuracy, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, product, services or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Khatabook will not be liable for the website being temporarily unavailable, due to any technical issues or otherwise, beyond its control and for any loss or damage suffered as a result of the use of or access to, or inability to use or access to this website whatsoever.